January is over – well almost!

Having survived Christmas the next challenge was to survive the big freeze! As always the good old UK was paralysed by at least 100mm of snow that lasted for almost a week. The Canadians were laughing all the way to their ski slopes.

What is it about us, every year we seem to have snow and every year all the schools close and the traffic slithers to a halt. Even the trains can’t run. What’s that about? The London Underground was badly affected, how does that happen? Underground snow?

You may well be asking what’s this got to do with gardening – and you’re right; nothing! Just wanted to get it off my chest, now back to the garden or not given that it’s water logged and partially frozen. So what should we be doing right now?

Well you can start by staying off your lawn if possible as it’ll be vulnerable having just come out from under all that snow and it’s probably be pretty soft too. Check the insulation on your cold frames and garden shed to ensure that all is in order.

Apart from clearing the paths of leaves and moss, if you can get to them, that’s about all at this time. Generally keeping the garden free of leaves is a good idea as it allows the soil and plants to benefit from any rise in temperature no mater how small. Until next time keep warm and happy days.

January to dos – if you want to brave the snow!!!

January is moving on a pace most of us are now in our second week back at work and the garden still needs attention, but only if the temperature and the daylight hours allow us to get there.

So, I thought I would give you my list of routine tasks for my garden. You may have a different order but it is still good to be out in the fresh air especially after a week in the office.

Pruning Wisteria

This is a great time for tidying up the long tendrils that have wrapped around the downpipes, telephone cables etc, just pay attention to not cutting the cables as this can be a costly mishap.

Fruit Trees

Only the pear and apple trees for now and if it is freezing don’t do them, remove crossing branches and any that are rubbing. Always take your time and choose the weaker of the two branches or the one growing in the wrong direction and look for buds facing the direction you want the tree to develop.

Fallen Leaves

Finish off clearing the fallen leaves as they can cause rot and keep the ground colder.

Timber Stuctures

Treatment of timber structures if the sun has come out and the temperature is above 5 or 6 and the timber is dry it is a great time to give them a coat of timber preservative such as creacote which is the replacement for the old creosote that now only available to professionals. If you don’t like the strong smell then try the timber treatments from the large DIY/Garden Centres, they do lots of colours so they help brighten your day too!

Ponds and Paths

Don’t forget that cleaning of ponds and paths is still important.

Top 10 other jobs for the month of January – not in any particular order:

  • Recycle your Christmas tree by shredding it for mulch
  • Ventilate the greenhouse on sunny (!) days
  • Dig over any vacant plots that have not been dug already
  • Repair and re-shape lawn edges
  • Inspect stored tubers of Dahlia Begonia and Canna for rots or drying out
  • Prune apple and pear trees
  • Start forcing rhubarb
  • Plan your vegetable crop rotations for the coming season
  • Keep putting out food and water for hungry birds
  • Prepare a polythene shelter for outdoor peaches and nectarines, to protect them from peach leaf curl

 

Happy New Year?

Welcome 2013, welcome reader(s). Its over – survived another Christmas, more than be said for the turkey!

With the festivities out of the way we can now turn our attention to other things including the garden.

Front page news on today’s Daily Telegraph is the forecast of the end of the home owner’s “bowling green” lawn. Various professors and experts tell us that the climate has it in for our poor old grass. Its ability to withstand the constant changeable weather and deluges is compromised by being cut short a la the bowling green.

The Odd Daisy and Buttercup

So their advice – leave your grass longer in the summer. Learn to put up with the odd daisy and buttercup because time spent in pursuit of the ideal lawn is not rewarded, and your grass suffers as a result.

Frequency and Height

As our regular reader(s) know the height at which you cut your grass is something that we have discussed before. One size does not fit all – so the home owner that has the lawnmower set at one height – come spring or autumn is not doing it properly. Likewise the frequency of mowing and the cutting height are linked. If you want our guidance you will find it here.